2. Catalight Young Scientist Symposium: Artificial Photosynthesis

Europe/Berlin
Online Conference

Online Conference

CYSS2021 will be hosted online using Zoom. The poster session will follow a dual-format approach using a chat-platform and videoconference rooms.
Carolin Müller (Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology) , Elisabeth Hofmeister (Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology) , Jannik Brückmann, Julian Hniopek (Leibniz Insitute of Photonic Technology) , Ludwig Schwiedrzik (University of Vienna) , Mathias Micheel (Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology) , Miftahussurur Putra (Ulm University) , Pascal Wintergerst (Ulm University) , Simon Clausing (Ulm University)
Description

The CataLight Young Scientist Symposium (CYSS) is an annual conference organized by PhD students and junior PostDocs of SFB/TRR 234 CataLight aimed at researchers in an early career stage in the field of light-driven catalysis and related fields. By employing an online format, we want to allow for the participation of young scientists, in particular PhD students, from all over the globe and offer them an opportunity to share their work, which have been especially sparse over the last year due to the cancellation of on-site conferences. Therefore the event will emphasize on talks from young scientists accompanied by selected invited talks.

In line with the research area of CataLight the symposium aims to cover all facets of the highly interdisciplinary field of artifical photosynthesis and water-splitting. We therefore welcome contributions from a diverse range of fields, includign design and synthesis of catalytic systems and support materials, (spectroscopic) characterization and theoretical research. For an in-depth explanation of our aims & scope, see our Scientific Programme.

CYSS2021 will take place on Tuesday and Thursdays between 21st and 30st September 2021.

Submission Deadline extended to August 14th 2021!

To facilitate in-depth discussion discussion or even collaboration between participants of CYSS, we're accompanying the symposium with an instant messaging service that can be used to contact the speakers or any other participants with more in-depth questions or exchange contact information for further discussion.

CYSS is supported by the SFB/TRR 234 CataLight. We gratefully acknowledge the funding by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Foundation - DFG).

 

Registration
Registration
    • 09:15 09:30
      Conference Opening 15m
    • 09:30 10:00
      Efficient one and two photon mechanisms: From heavy atom and spin effects in photocatalysis to blue-light driven upconversion 30m
      Speaker: Prof. Christoph Kerzig (University of Mainz)
    • 10:00 10:40
      Morning Session
    • 10:40 10:50
      Coffee Break 10m
    • 10:50 12:00
      Morning Session
    • 14:15 15:15
      "Scientific Speed Dating" 1h

      Get to know the other participants.
      Present your research and your interests in 2 minutes. To multiple groups of 5 fellow young researchers.

    • 15:30 16:00
      Nanocarbon in Photochemistry and Electrochemistry 30m

      Artificial photosynthesis, a process in which the light energy is converted into the chemical bond, represents an important area of research aimed toward generation of Sun-derived fuels and value-added chemicals. To successfully utilize photons from Sun, such solar reactors need to contain light-absorbing chromophores that efficiently and rapidly channel the absorbed energy toward desired catalytic sites where useful chemistry can takes place with high selectivity and low kinetic barriers. The Glusac group investigates molecular chromophores and catalysts for artificial photosynthesis. We utilize advanced time-resolved laser spectroscopy techniques to investigate mechanisms of energy and charge migration in molecular excited states and evaluate the parameters that control undesired energy losses through fast charge recombination. We also explore molecular electrocatalysts that are able to receive electrons and holes from excited chromophores and covert then into desired products.

      Three projects are currently under investigation in our labs: (i) Bio-inspired CO2 reduction using metal-free NAD+/NADH analogs, where we look for strong hydride donors that can selectively reduce CO2 to methanol and that can be recycled photochemically; (ii) Light-harvesting by graphene quantum dot assemblies, where we explore excited-state energy and charge redistributions in chromophore-catalyst assemblies using advanced time-resolved laser spectroscopy methods; (iii) Carbon-based platforms for electrocatalysis. In this project, we investigate methods to decorate carbon electrodes with molecular catalytic motifs that can perform useful chemistry.

      Speaker: Prof. Ksenija Glusac (University of Illinois at Chicago)
    • 16:00 16:40
      Afternoon Session
    • 16:40 16:50
      Coffee Break 10m
    • 16:50 18:00
      Afternoon Session
    • 09:30 10:00
      A search for new photophysics and photochemistry with metal complexes 30m

      This talk will focus on three different topics. In the first part, I will present recent results obtained by Mirjam Schreier, Xingwei Guo and Björn Pfund on photo-triggered hydrogen atom transfer (photo-HAT) between an iridium hydride complex and olefins.1 Whilst photoinduced electron transfer (PET) is very common for transition metal complexes, photo-HAT is rare.
      In the second part, I will talk about unusually photostable ruthenium(II) complexes investigated by Lucius Schmid and Christoph Kerzig, and how these complexes (with their high triplet energies) are useful for photoredox and energy transfer catalysis.2
      In the final part, I will tell about our latest adventures in the development diisocyanide complexes as Earth-abundant analogs of well-known ruthenium(II) polypyridines. This will include Jakob Bilger’s deep red molybdenum(0) emitter that he used for triplet-triplet annihilation upconversion,3 and some new first-row transition metal luminophores.

      (1) Schreier, M. R.; Pfund, B.; Guo, X.; Wenger, O. S. Chem. Sci. 2020, 11, 8582.
      (2) Schmid, L.; Kerzig, C.; Prescimone, A.; Wenger, O. S. JACS Au 2021, doi: 10.1021/jacsau.1c00137.
      (3) Bilger, J. B.; Kerzig, C.; Larsen, C. B.; Wenger, O. S. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2021, 143, 1651.

      Speaker: Prof. Oliver Wenger (University of Basel)
    • 10:00 10:40
      Morning Session
    • 10:40 10:50
      Coffee Break 10m
    • 10:50 12:00
      Morning Session
    • 14:00 15:30
      Poster Session
    • 15:30 16:00
      Energy upconversion using semiconductor nanocrystal-organic hybrid materials 30m
      Speaker: Prof. Troy van Voorhis (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)
    • 16:00 16:40
      Afternoon Session
    • 16:40 16:50
      Coffee Break 10m
    • 16:50 18:00
      Afternoon Session
    • 18:15 19:15
      "Scientific Speed Dating" 1h

      Get to know the other participants.
      Present your research and your interests in 2 minutes. To multiple groups of 5 fellow young researchers.

    • 09:30 10:00
      Invited Talk 30m
    • 10:00 10:40
      Morning Session
    • 10:40 10:50
      Coffee Break 10m
    • 10:50 12:00
      Morning Session
    • 15:30 16:10
      Afternoon Session
    • 16:10 16:40
      Towards Solar Factories 30m

      The solar-driven photocatalytic splitting of water into hydrogen and oxygen is a potential source of clean and renewable fuel. However, four decades of global research have proven this multi-step reaction to be highly challenging. Here, I will present our strategies, and most recent results, in taking photocatalyst production to new and unexplored frontiers, while exploring solar to chemical conversion that goes beyond water splitting. I will focus on unique design of innovative nano scale particles, which harness nano phenomena for improved activity, and methodologies for the construction of sophisticated heterostructures. I will share our design rules and accumulated insights, which enabled us to demonstrate efficient, and stable, full-cycle endothermic redox transformations, realizing a genuine solar-to-fuel energy conversion, with state of the art efficiencies of up to 4.2%.

      Speaker: Prof. Lilac Amirav (Schulich Faculty of Chemisty, Technion - Israel Institut of Technology)
    • 16:40 16:50
      Coffee Break 10m
    • 16:50 18:00
      Afternoon Session
    • 18:00 19:30
      Poster Session
    • 09:30 10:00
      A molecular view at the interface between water and a photocatalyst 30m
      Speaker: Prof. Ellen Backus (University of Vienna)
    • 10:00 10:40
      Morning Session
    • 10:40 10:50
      Coffee Break 10m
    • 10:50 12:00
      Morning Session
    • 15:30 16:00
      When molecules meet materials: Heterogenised molecular systems for CO2 reduction and H2 evolution reaction 30m

      Conversion of CO2 and water into fuels and value-added chemicals using renewable electrical or solar energy offers a promising route to mitigate anthropogenic carbon footprint and reduce our reliance on fossil fuels and petroleum industry. However, the challenge lies to develop suitable catalysts that can lower the kinetic barriers for water splitting and CO2 activation, and drive the fuel synthesis selectively toward the desired product(s). Molecular catalysts fascinate synthetic chemists the most due to their tuneability, which allows us to tailor the structure to fine-tune their intrinsic properties. However, these molecular systems are somewhat disadvantaged by practical consideration because they often function in homogeneous solution and displays limited long-term stability. Having an effective scaffold to mount the catalyst on, representing 'heterogenisation' of the molecule, is a key part of building a practical system that brings together the benefits of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis. In this talk, I will explore two different approaches towards fabricating hybrid electro- and photo-catalytic materials, (1) utilisation of molecular catalysts as building blocks for synthesis of modular porous materials,[1] and (2) direct immobilisation of molecular complexes onto semiconducting materials for solar-driven transformations.[2,3] Final part of the talk will focus on demonstrating how the fuel-forming cathodic half-reaction (CO2 reduction) can be applied in a coupled electrolyser to produce value-added chemicals at the anode via organic electrooxidation.[4]

      [1] S. Roy†, Z. Huang†, A. Bhunia, A. Castner, A. Kumar, X. Zou, S. Ott; J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2019, 141, 15942–15950
      [2] S. Roy, E. Reisner; Angew. Chem. Int. Ed., 2019, 58, 12180–12184.
      [3] S. Roy, M. Miller, J. Warnan, J.J. Leung, C.D. Sahm, E. Reisner; ACS Catal., 2021, 11, 1868–1876
      [4] M. A. Bajada†, S. Roy†, J. Warnan†, K. Abdiaziz, A. Wagner, M. M. Roessler, E. Reisner; Angew. Chem. Int. Ed., 2020, 59, 15633–15641

      Speaker: Dr Souvik Roy (University of Lincoln)
    • 16:00 16:40
      Afternoon Session
    • 16:40 16:50
      Coffee Break 10m
    • 16:50 18:00
      Afternoon Session